Browse Category: Coastal Style

When Mother Nature Meets with Your Modern Nature

Much like cooking, mixing interior designs can create new and interesting flavors. Look at mixing contemporary detailing with cottage style. The result is a hot, clean layout which allows occupants to center on the interior architecture and the exterior views.

Mixing two aesthetics which seem counterintuitive can bring about a fresh appearance. The important thing is highlighting the best attributes from the styles in a manner that blends naturally. Listed below are a couple of important details that create this unexpected aesthetic.

WA Design Architects

Live border slab table. Furniture choice plays a big role in the modern cottage mix. A slab of a fallen tree with its border left natural places the tone perfectly. Warm and rustic, this table is also contemporary because of its easy form.

Robert Hawkins

Modern lighting. Contemplate modern lighting choices contrary to the warmth of wood. Glass, pewter and iron are all excellent contrasting materials.

Whitten Architects

Highlight floor-to-ceiling viewpoints. The glory of a cottage is the surrounding landscape. Highlight towering pines with a modern-style floor-to-ceiling window. Look at a contemporary window free of mullions and casings, and allow the pines include the rustic half of this equation.

DxDempsey Architecture

Stair railroad with attitude. Insert modern components of steel, iron or steel cable onto a stair rail. Cabins frequently have double-height great rooms with a focal stair rail. Utilize this chance to combine in some contemporary detailing.

Uptic Studios

Duplicate horizontal lines. A flat orientation of substances will translate contemporary or transitional. Horizontal lines featured within rustic components such as concrete or wood siding is an eye contrast comparison.

On Site Management, Inc..

Textured neutrals. Consider all the texture from rustic wood particulars in cabinets, beams and floors. Now layer that look with neutral finishes such as concrete countertops and several shades of grey for an ideal modern cottage mix.

Studio William Hefner

Full-height fireplace. There’s nothing like a hot fire in a cottage on a snowy night — much better a fire at a mountain thunderstorm. Insert contemporary drama with a full-height fireplace. Modern and rustic material choices for a fireplace could be copper, natural rock or stainless steel.

Coburn Development

Lighten up. Yes, wood beams and siding can be lightened up. Create a clean and contemporary aesthetic with a lighter, monochromatic palette. Take whitewashing or a mild stain on beams and siding with pale walls.

JayJeffers

Proceed without window treatments. Let the outside in by bypassing the drapes. Highlight straight, contemporary lines of wood casings on windows instead of softening them with window treatments.

Charles Cunniffe Architects Aspen

Go light on pattern. A contemporary aesthetic really is defined more by what is made out of what is additional. Go light. Contemplate solids or a simple stripe to comparison the rustic lushness of the environment.

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Eclectic Repurposing Fits First-Time Homeowners in Utah

Described as a “type of mutt,” this 1911 home in Salt Lake City has been an perfect match for first-time homeowners and stepbrothers Ian Wade and David Kamp. The group benefited from upgrades done by a former homeowner, who had gutted and remodeled the home after it had been neglected for a long time. Two add-ons raised the living space: a rear room, and also the stepbrothers have since transformed into a lounge area using a DIY bar, plus another floor, which they turned into a guest room.

The inviting, open layout proved to be a major draw for both, who share passions for creating artwork, entertaining and cooking meaningful dishes for family members. Wade, 24, says he’s “filled the shoes of a philosophy student, bartender and athlete”; he is now co-owner of fashion boutique Fresh. Kamp, 25, describes himself as a “decorative scholar and explorer,” and works as an independent designer and a server at a neighborhood pub. During their combined wallpapers, a hybrid minimalist-meets-rustic design has blossomed.

at a Glance
Who lives here: Stepbrothers Ian Wade and David Kamp, and their bichon-terrier combination, Earl
Location: Sugar House neigborhood of Salt Lake City
Size: 2,000 square feet; 5 bedrooms, 3 baths

Lucy Call

Wade and Kamp had been purchasing furniture for three months before they got the keys to their own residence. “We’d all these components which were theoretically going to work together, but we could not really tell, since they were set aside at distinct antique shops and furniture stores,” Wade says.

The stepbrothers maintained all the furniture pieces neutral, so when they’d finally all sit under precisely the same roof, they’d be cohesive and work nicely with the existing tan walls. “Each element would appear in spurts. We got the dining room set up, then the couch showed up, and each of the pieces came together real quick,” he says.

Wade remembers the very first day alone at the home: “After the hustle of moving in and getting things sorted in their proper place, I spent a Saturday night unwinding from this process with a few beers, and it sunk in that this was my property.”

Lucy Call

A sizable reclaimed wood table matches the dining room space, in which Wade, in white, and Kamp love dinner and coffee with friends (not shown). The table is from the early 1900s and was initially used at a farmhouse and then by a traveling salesman.

Dining set: Urban Vintage; pendant light: Elemente

Lucy Call

Wade enjoys pieces that achieve a lasting impact through thoughtful layout, such as this early-20th-century coffee table from Urban Vintage and midcentury green chair from Elemente. “My decorating style is one which adheres to usefulness,” he says. “I really don’t like clutter, and I don’t like things to be there without a real purpose.”

Couch: Lofgrens

Lucy Call

“I’d call my design a rustic fusion of midcentury and turn of the century,” says Kamp. This blend of styles is observed in his pairing a century-old coffee table which initially was an old hay bale cart using a midcentury-style tufted couch. The corner painting, by painter and friend Morgan Richard Murphy, is creatively hung with binder clips.

Lucy Call

Kamp and Wade decided to not hang drapes or blinds on any of those double-pane windows, therefore they’d have to rely on organic light than artificial.

Kamp wishes to finally replace the carpet with wood.

Lucy Call

The stepbrothers discovered this old ladder out an antiques store, and Kamp had the idea to use it as a shelf to balance out the low profile of another living room furnishings. They simply closed the ladder closed and leaned it against the walls, creating shelves on each rung for book display.

“Aesthetics are the largest driving factor in my life, from my home down to my smallest trinkets. I enjoy the world I build to represent me as honestly as possible,” Kamp says.

Lucy Call

Kamp and Wade maintained the kitchen easy, as it is a high-traffic region which will get dirty quickly. However, it soon became Wade’s preferred place. “We’ve got a record player and coffee there. Having the ability to put on an LP and also make good coffee are just two things which give me so much satisfaction,” he says.

Lucy Call

Kamp’s bedroom is full of items that reveal his personality and resourcefulness. The big typographical painting was awarded to him from the artist, Morgan Richard Murphy; it reminds Kamp of if he lived in Portland and went to school together with Murphy, when they were both start to develop their creative talents.

Lucy Call

Kamp cleverly repurposed an older photography enlarger for a shelf.

Lucy Call

Wade repurposed old crates as shelves in his bedroom, to exhibit some of his cherished things at a boutique-like way.

Lucy Call

Wade bought the crates via Craigslist from a set designer. He believes that a bedroom should be a place for sleeping and getting ready for the afternoon, so the shelves were designed with practicality in mind. The bottom shelf shows things that he generally puts in his pockets. The next one holds watches and similar products.

Lucy Call

The back add-on to the first home is where Wade and Kamp like to amuse with their residence pub. The windows look out to the yard, where both plan to put in a garden.

Lucy Call

One of Wade and Kamp’s first projects for their home was the bar, made from repurposed old crates and salvaged transport tractors. The crates function as shelves and are styled with mason jars and bottles.

Lucy Call

This Kamp takes a turn throwing darts at a board set up in the bar space. Both leaning scoreboards have been a DIY project made with scrap pieces of plywood and chalkboard spray paint.

Lucy Call

The stepbrothers found the home through a group of youthful Realtors and designers known as the City Home Collective. Both were attracted to the diverse and growing Sugarhouse neighborhood, filled with new eateries and a healthy mix of young professionals, first-time homeowners and small families. Kamp says, “I love the capacity of my town. It’s young and cheap, and is full of beautiful old buildings and houses waiting for the right owners.”

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It Takes a Village: Two Homes

While most people wish to construct a home that’s under a single roof, there are instances when building the home as a series of connected or freestanding pavilions is desired. Perhaps the home serves multiple generations or have to accommodate an ever-changing mixture of family members. Or maybe the home develops over time, to ensure a home expansion is a new pavilion instead of simply an addition.

Here are just two houses which were made to resemble small villages instead of being monolithic structures. While both have their roots set deeply in their various locales, coastal Maine and Piedmont, Virginia, equally take a decidedly modern approach to family living, with the best of both traditional and the modern, the individual and the family.

Elliott + Elliott Architecture

The first home is in coastal Maine and looks like, on strategy, a small Maine fishing village. From the waterside the home looks like a fishing village so it wouldn’t be a surprise to see locals pull up in a boat to roam around, procuring a new lobster in the process.

Elliott + Elliott Architecture

From the roadside the home clearly shows off its Maine heritage, with traditional gable roofs, wood shake siding and roofing, and soft grays and browns which are, in spirit if not in actuality, the end result of that weathering that can happen only in Maine.

Elliott + Elliott Architecture

Each freestanding pavilion is a simple, gable-shaped structure which has small windows and a taut skin to withstand the bitter-cold Maine winters.

Elliott + Elliott Architecture

And while each arrangement is separate from its neighbors, there’s an urbanity for their arrangement, just like one finds at the best of Maine’s small towns. A consistent substance and color palette in addition to a consistency in form and detail be certain that the whole “village” is just one.

Elliott + Elliott Architecture

The interiors are where the saying of modernity takes hold. Open floor plans, tall ceilings and massive expanses of glass to look at the water out of are where this home separates itself from the traditional.

Bushman Dreyfus Architects

Traveling down the Eastern Seaboard a couple hundred kilometers is where we encounter the second home that’s been created as a small community. But in this case, a rural Virginia home, the layout was inspired by local farming estates.

Bushman Dreyfus Architects

It’s a closely dressed group of pavilions that seem like they might have been assembled over time. The main building mass is unmistakable, with its big chimney and notable central position, and the structures are organized in a hierarchical order that’s unmistakable.

Bushman Dreyfus Architects

While the arrangement and types of the structures are, like the house’s Maine cousin, steeped in convention, there is no mistaking that this house belongs to our century. The materials, crisp detailing and simplicity of this are completely modern.

Bushman Dreyfus Architects

And that modernity is accepted indoors, where an open plan which enables a casual 21st-century lifestyle is to be found.

Bushman Dreyfus Architects

Light-filled volumes of distance replace the traditional ceiling.

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Red and Black Pop in a Penthouse

As they say: It pays to wait. For interior stylist Angelo De Bock, his individual, yearlong search led him to an enviable penthouse in Cologne, Germany, blessed with a rooftop terrace and a view of the famous Cologne Cathedral. Located in the Belgian section of the inner city — known for its art shops, trendy restaurants and proximity to the old city — De Bock’s penthouse is spread across the top two floors of some grand A-frame, five-story construction. But with all the benefits of snagging the top floor came columns and eaves’ struggle. De Bock tackled both layout challenges with semi displayed international finds, a concentrated color scheme and tactical paint remedies.

at a Glance
Who lives here: Angelo De Bock
Location: Inner city of Cologne, Germany
Size: 145 square meters (1,560 square feet) plus a 50-square-meter (538-square-foot) roof terrace; 1 bedroom, 2 baths, home office

in3interieur

Thanks to expansive windows, the living area is flooded with light, at the top level. The pristine white walls complement the floor and furniture, but De Bock says, “I am thinking of painting the central pillar a darker color to make it less current.”

in3interieur

The massive jewel chandelier near the seating area is by Dutch designer Jurgen Bey. Wrapped in a contemporary reflective lampshade, the lighting fixture is a marriage of styles.

While working at Maison & Objets in Paris this year, De Bock brought home this cosmetic red bird to miss his dining and kitchen room.

in3interieur

A strong wooden dining table De Bock purchased because of his previous home is combined with a custom-built tufted high-back seat by Job Interieur.

in3interieur

The large windows lining the walls frame rooftop views of the inner city.

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A black and red cosmetic clock bridges the two floors and De Bock’s color idea. A corner reading nook offers smart storage space and perspectives of the rooftop terrace.

in3interieur

While the upper floor is swathed in neutral and also understated colors, the lower floor is dressed up in black and red. This is the home office. De Bock painted the bull against a checkered background as an ode to his love of its own culture and Spain.

Paint: Picture Gallery Red No. 42, Farrow & Ball (wall); Railings No. 31, Farrow & Ball (column)

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Shades of black and red and also a whimsical checkered pattern are replicated throughout the room.

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De Bock enjoys collecting art pieces throughout his trips abroad. A Pinocchio doll from the Czech Republic is exhibited in a transparent presentation box under his desk.

Glass instance: Polspotten

in3interieur

Another among De Bock’s original paintings is set against a sharp white background. Neighborhood he painted a rectangular place red to create a digital bookcase with three mounted shelves to display his artwork and style books.

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The spacious master bedroom also keeps with the color palette.

Over the tufted headboard is an icon of a house soul. According to Eastern European tradition, a home spirit is thought to protect the home, looking after certain important members or the entire household. This mythical creature is a significant source of inspiration for the function as an interior designer and decorator of De Bock.

A plush bench and a collection of Moroccan cushions give more luxury and relaxation.

Bed: Scapa Home

in3interieur

Opposite the bed, a large drum table, vintage traveling purses, Moroccan ottomans and a glass box displaying antique books and a world highlight the homeowner’s eclectic tastes.

Side table: Brass Drum Lamp Table, Timothy Oulton

in3interieur

A mask on the cupboard handle winks at the global style of the room.

Paint: Dauphin Brown and Picture Gallery Red No. 42, both by Farrow & Ball; cabinet: Flamant

in3interieur

Into a bedroom turned . He reversed the color scheme, with black as an anchor and red as an accent.

in3interieur

He painted black squares and rectangles to creatively frame paintings and family pictures. A daybed out of Ikea doubles as a seat and guest bed.

in3interieur

Entering the apartment out of the building’s elevator, people are satisfied with closet mirrors that reflect a trailer of their air and reveal part of their home office, the stairs to the upper living area floor and the hallway resulting in the bathrooms and dressing area.

Paint: Vert de Terre, Farrow & Ball

in3interieur

All rooms on the lower floor are fitted with adjustable spotlights. These strong light beams create an additional visual dimension and may be readjusted for mood lighting.

Ceiling lights: Delta

in3interieur

From the upper level, glass doors lead to a large rooftop terrace ready for its first sign of spring.

in3interieur

This photograph, taken by De Bock, shows his terrace in the summer.

in3interieur

This is the terrace around Christmas.

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The olive tree branches on the terrace leave room to get a peek at Cologne Cathedral, with its impressive darkened Gothic tower, in the distance.

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De Bock awakens in his reading nook. “When arriving home from a day in the city, my home feels comfortable, safe and luxury,” he says. “Since I’ve lived here, it’s been endless enjoyment.”

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About Trend: Get a Leg up With British Tables and Chairs on Design

Perhaps it’s just me, but sometimes everything I look at becomes anthropomorphic. The grille of the car has a certain smile, the teapot spout is tooting to be an elephant and those chairs and tables all seem about to walk off. It is just something about these legs.

The angled legs add life and personality to every one of these simple layouts. Whether legs or four, short or tall, thin or fat, each set of thighs provides added flair to the modern pieces they’re part of. The British are known for their book, and these designs showcase that attribute with no of those stodginess. Now, if you will excuse me, I’d better go catch the side desk running down my hallway.

Note: Bark Furniture and Another Country items are available directly from their sites. Contact Atelier Areti, Assembly Room and Dare Studio via their sites for distribution information.

bark furniture

Beacon Desk – GBP 1,875

Placed against a wall, this desk will give the impression that it is propped precariously, because of its angled front legs — though of course it is really quite hardy.

bark furniture

Acorn Side Table – GBP 395

Its small size and stocky angled legs imply this table name is Baby. It will add just a hint of childhood sitting alongside a more mature couch.

Atelier Areti

Vienna Stool

Wire footrests add visual support to those slim angled legs. The curved top is a stylish addition to anyone’s back end!

northamerica.anothercountry.com

Console One – $710

Simplicity reigns in this table. The angled legs give it stability; the very simple form gives it functionality.

northamerica.anothercountry.com

Another Chair – $540

There are no frills with this chair, just clean repeating angles to support you where it is put: dinner table, studio or office.

Prudence Nesting Tables – $1,850

The inset of the legs strengthens that beautiful repeating angle on every one of those nesting tables.

assemblyroom.co.uk

Allesley Side Table

These angled legs converge nearly into one form, reaching to support the surface of the table. The tabletop includes an inset linoleum center circle, insulated for your coffee cups.

Dare Studio Katakana Ottoman – GBP 800

These lanky little angled legs support a hefty ottoman cushion — visit that the matching couch and chair in Dare Studio’s web site.

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Transparency Guides That a Woodland Home

Two quite detail-oriented clients dwelt in this midcentury modern house for decades, contemplating how they’d love to remodel, completing a comprehensive search for an architect and mentally preparing for the huge job.

They discovered Nils Finne, an architect who enjoys taking advantage of the technology available in Seattle to create complex details for his layouts. Finne is a believer in sustainable design, especially “rightsizing,” as well as in creating a design that will endure the test of time and utilizing natural light. The resulting collaboration is a home that respects the first structure, adopts its coastal setting, functions for its residents’ lifestyle and is at the same time warm and modern.

at a Glance
Location: Lake Forest, Washington (about 25 miles from Seattle)
Size: 2 bedrooms, two baths
Year redesign completed: 2010

FINNE Architects

One of the main aims was to make transparency between the inside and the 4-acre wooded parcel around it. “Natural light is critical to my projects,” states Finne. “Especially here in the Pacific Northwest, natural light is a valuable commodity.” New windows, a new front door and a row of clerestory windows allow in as much light as possible.

Before Photo

BEFORE: Here is the same view as from the previous photo, before the renovation. “We really had a larger extent when we began the job than we wound up completing,” states Finne. “Originally, we needed a distinct garage/guest room structure from the plans, but when forced to choose due to budget limitations, they chose high levels of craftsmanship and details over having more house.” The present carport was enhanced and included, and the initial footprint didn’t gain an inch.

FINNE Architects

Finne eliminated a powder room to start the entryway.

FINNE Architects

“I wanted the front door to serve as a visual stopping thing,” states Finne. He designed a woven-like pattern from Douglas fir and satin-edge glass. The doorway’s intricate details foreshadow what is inside.

“I couldn’t dream of crafting all these details without the complex, cutting edge fabricators and machine stores which are characteristic of Seattle,” he states. Finne dubs his strategy “crafted modernism — the enrichment of a modernist aesthetic with highly personal, crafted substances and items.”

FINNE Architects

“I frequently push my clients to provide up space by combining rooms,” states Finne. “For example, having a family room where everyone hangs out and a formal living room no one ever uses is a waste of space”

FINNE Architects

A well-concealed TV signifies the living area and the family room no longer have to be separate spaces. Finne designed this custom made cabinet with flat doors which slide back to show the plasma display and a very long vertical part on the left to maintain a speaker.

The timber dividers have a scoop-carved pattern Finne designed that has been implemented with a CNC (computer numerical control) router. The pattern is repeated creating persistence.

FINNE Architects

Architectural details throughout the house include cherry cabinets, stained Douglas fir window trim, first hemlock ceilings and fir beams. Weathered steel covers the wall on the left side. “It is kind of a homemade Cor-Ten,” states Finne, laughing. “We let it rust outside and saved some cash.”

Finne designed the chandelier over the dining table with 33-inch tubes of cut glass.

FINNE Architects

Built-in storage saves space in the dining area. The carved wood details continue along these drawers; Finne was cautious to use the pattern in the ideal dosage. “The pattern is 12 inches high. I love to integrate large, flat surfaces to give relief,” he states. From the dining area, he used resin panels.

Before Photo

BEFORE: The first kitchen was filled with hot timber, but it felt dark and cramped.

FINNE Architects

Is the terrazzo. As opposed to trying to match it exactly, Finne added a darker terrazzo for contrast. Further down the hallway he used a mottled concrete flooring stained to resemble the original terrazzo.

Finne also designed the stools, which unite hard-edged wrought iron steel with handwoven rush seats.

FINNE Architects

Finne enlisted a local glass studio to kiln-fire shards of Starphire glass into a 1-inch-thick breakfast bar. Starphire is a new low-iron glass the less iron, the less of a green hue glass has.

“The glass has a Milky Way–such as wispy pattern for it,” states Finne. “The glass becomes magical when you turn on the uplights.”

FINNE Architects

The master suite proceeds the feeling of transparency between the house and the forests.

FINNE Architects

“I wanted bathing to feel quite au naturel, full of light, almost primeval … as if you’re bathing outside in the forests,” he states.

FINNE Architects

Finne’s scooped wood pattern reappears on the cantilevered vanity. The floors and countertops are limestone, the shower door is Starphire glass along with the pendant lights are all by Bruck.

Go ahead and do a double take at this photo; will you tell where the mirrors over the vanity end and the glass begins?

FINNE Architects

Lake Forest Park Renovation

If looking at the master bath pictures made you be worried about peeping Toms, don’t worry. A 1/4-inch-thick custom made metal valence camouflages the toilet window’s extensive shades. “I am always interested in taking a cold, industrial material such as steel and employing cutting-edge technologies to transform it into something organic,” Finne states. “This pattern is lyrical and fragile; the steel is no longer industrial and cold”

FINNE Architects

A sliding patterned glass panel divides the master bedroom from the hallway. Finne drew the pattern freehand with a pen, then digitized it and had it transfered into a film for its glass. The pattern is thickest at the bottom and lightens up as it moves higher.

FINNE Architects

The glass panels allow the room to receive natural light from different areas of the house while still closing it off. Finne additionally added fir into the ceilings which were not covered in timber.

The completed renovations maintain the soul of their first structure living while strengthening a poetic connection between the home and its particular environment.

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Modernist Icons Take the Floor at Brooklyn

Brazil native Daniel Vianna has attracted his fresh and contemporary style from Rio de Janeiro into his new Brooklyn, New York, apartment. After settling into his rented space only a couple of blocks from The Pratt Institute, he wasted no time putting together an eclectic collection of seminal modernist furnishings. An industrial design student, Vianna wanted to go for something different than the conventional fitting furniture collections. “When it’s done it’ll be like a shop,” he states. “A showroom for contemporary industrial design.”

in a Glance
Who resides: Daniel Vianna
Location: Clinton Hill neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York
Size: Approximately 1,000 square feet; 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom

Chris A Dorsey Photography

Hardwood floors run throughout the open-concept apartment. Storage cabinets sit into the far right, and doors in the end of the distance lead to a mini balcony.

Chris Dorsey: How is an architect and an industrial design student influenced how you designed your home?

Daniel Vianna: In a young age, younger than many, I have been interested in everything from furniture to building. I am 30 years old today, so I believe that it is not so much of being an architecture student who has impacted my personal design, but my design has compelled me for a student — to constantly find out more.

Chris A Dorsey Photography

CD: Why did you opt to combine the dining room chair styles?

DV: It’s wonderful to have a little comparison, as there are so many distinct pieces out there. While I have friends over, they have the chance to determine which chair to sit down in. The Victoria Ghost Chairfrom Philippe Starck took a very long time to buy because I wasn’t certain how it’d match or if I’d enjoy it here. But now, when my friends come over, I enjoy choosing that seat because it’s pretty straightforward.

Pendant lighting: Piper Grande, YLighting

Chris A Dorsey Photography

Glossy white cabinetry with doorways and hinges provides just the correct amount of storage. The countertop is Caesarstone Blizzard, as a fruit bowl, and Design serves.

Scrabble piece magnets decorate Vianna’s stainless steel fridge.

Chris A Dorsey Photography

DV: I enjoy this Experts Chair by Philippe Starck since it encompasses the shapes of the 3 classic chair forms in one piece, so it’s kind of historically referential. It reinterprets the 7 Series by Arne Jacobsen, the Tulip Armchair by Eero Saarinen and the Eiffel Chair by Charles Eames all in one.

Chris A Dorsey Photography

CD: What’s your favorite collected piece?

DV:
I really don’t know whether I could pick a favorite. Though maybe this Moooi bunny lamp. I enjoy it because it’s sort of a joke. As one of a three-piece set, they also designed one as a horse — as in, a life-sized horse with a lampshade above its mind and a pig table. The bunny is more subtle. Additionally, my 2-year-old niece is mad for this. I lifted the colour and she kept pointing to where it attaches to the mind of this bunny and saying, “Take it off! Take it off!”

Chris A Dorsey Photography

The May Day table lamp by Konstantin Grcic, a lively lamp out of FlosUSA, sits atop a Cappellini New Antique side table. A colorful Eames Hang-It-All provides Vianna a place to hang outerwear.

Chris A Dorsey Photography

On the other side of couch, a Bourgie Table Lamp, designed by Ferruccio Laviani, sits on a Cappellini side table.

What’s another addition to his group? “There are so many bits I would like to have at the end, it’s difficult to choose what’s next,” states Vianna.

CD: Where did you supply all those bits?

DV: Once I moved to New York from Brazil, everything in here was out of Ikea. Piece by piece, except for the couch, I have been in a position to substitute the Ikea bits together with the actual thing. I’ve bits by Philippe Starck, Eero Saarinen and Vitra. They’re mostly from style stores, though some are out of antique stores around New York.

Chris A Dorsey Photography

CD: Would you have a favorite designer?

DV: I’d say Brazilian architect Paulo Mendes da Rocha. He has this style — industrial with colorful, contemporary textures. He creates these chilly, concrete walls with every thing in grayscale. That’s what I want to do if I return to Brazil. It’s really great for me when you’re able to view something and then create it. I am hoping I will design something like that in Brazil, a mixture of modernism with unique textures.

Storage unit: Cloud by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, Cappellini

Chris A Dorsey Photography

Southwest-facing glass doors allow natural light to completely flooding the space.

Chris A Dorsey Photography

Framed Andy Warhol soup-can prints line the hallway leading to the bedrooms and the bathroom.

Chris A Dorsey Photography

CD: What design projects are you working on?

DV: I made a soap dish as my first industrial design project for college. I designed it with a parametric layout and fabricated it onto a 3-D printer. The dish is small, but I actually use it. I have also tested the MakerBot, which I simply got not too long ago. I haven’t been able to utilize it as much as I enjoy since there was a two-month wait list.

Chris A Dorsey Photography

The mark of any fantastic designer is a worn out workspace with some character. This second bedroom is Vianna’s office.

Vianna says his set of contemporary design icons is far from complete, but it adds a lively and lively design twist into his temporary space in the meantime. He intends to select the collection together with him back to Brazil following graduation.

Chris A Dorsey Photography

Vianna’s apartment building is situated at Brooklyn’s Clinton Hill neighborhood. Host to many pubs, restaurants and markets, it’s a wonderful spot to be a young professional.

c: Are you currently a student with a creative, contemporary area? Discuss it with us!

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Hillside Sanctuary in Vermont

Homeowners David Hart and Demaris Wehr wanted to make a sanctuary overlooking scenic views of a valley and farm in Vermont. Getting that prized view meant working with a north-facing slope. They requested Milford Cushman of this Cushman Design Group to operate around the challenging landscape and make a small home incorporating the natural space around it.

“David, a psychologist, spent his life researching fairy tales, and that played a key role in the design of the house,” Cushman says. “It is a particular place, and even with the site’s challenges, it’s hard not to feel the spiritual and sociological aspects of the house. David and Demaris were quite thoughtful about all of the things they desired in their property.”

at a Glance
Who lives here: Demaris Wehr and David Hart
Location: Calais, Vermont
Size: 1,850 square feet; 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms
That’s intriguing: all of the natural timber surfaces interior are custom constructed with locally harvested Eastern white pine.

Susan Teare, Professional Photographer

Three narrow amounts are stacked on a fundamental 16-foot by 38-foot footprint to create use of the sloping site and to join all of habitable rooms into the views and natural daylight in each direction. Simple roof forms with broad overhangs provide summer shading and long-term protection of this timber siding whilst serving to floor the construction as a broad cap.

Susan Teare, Professional Photographer

Wehr and Hart’s goals were to make a rich and peaceful residence where guests could be exposed. The religious connection to the property was significant. The designer stuffed the house with light and environmentally friendly finishes, thoughtfully designing each detail.

Susan Teare, Professional Photographer

All the natural wood surfaces are treated using polymerized tung oil (PTO) and without any oil-based urethanes, making it an exceptionally sustainable living space. PTO is more environmentally secure than other penetrating oils.

Susan Teare, Professional Photographer

The built-ins, thoughtful stuff and massive windows that allow plenty of light into the open-room space were all lifestyle choices to the homeowners. They desired to feel like being in meditation.

Susan Teare, Professional Photographer

The ceiling is shiplap design using local white pine. The European-style freestanding wood stove by Scan 60 is energy efficient, with direct air link to the exterior.

Susan Teare, Professional Photographer

All the natural wood surfaces — such as floors, windows, door casings, running trim and stair treads — are custom constructed with locally harvested Eastern white pine. The countertops are made of heart pine in standing dead trees.

Susan Teare, Professional Photographer

The natural-form theme runs throughout the home. Wehr and Hart desired the substances in the house to be attached to something living at one time, especially local timber, a renewable source. The dining room table is one of Wehr’s preferred places to write.

Susan Teare, Professional Photographer

Wehr enjoys the intimate connection of this central place of the kitchen into the dining space and the living room. All the windows fill the kitchen with direct and indirect lighting. She also appreciates that along with the white pine cabinets and the center pine counters, all of the wood surfaces in the kitchen are finished with various sheens of tung oil rather than polyurethane, varnish or lacquer.

Susan Teare, Professional Photographer

Thoughtful details are located throughout the house, to allow spaces to leak into one another. The easy kitchen cabinetry layout has glass doors and local artisan components.

Susan Teare, Professional Photographer

All the built-in cabinetry from the bedroom, including the dresser, shelves and bath vanity, is made from locally harvestedEastern white pine.

Susan Teare, Professional Photographer

Wehr and Hart revealed Cushman an image of a fairy home in Wales for design inspiration. They also showed an image of a natural home tucked into a hillside in gnarls and corners of roots. In every season, this house feels just like a fairy tale.

Susan Teare, Professional Photographer

A screened-in porch off the dining area and a deck off the living room extend the house’s connection to the website.

Susan Teare, Professional Photographer

Wehr and Hart shared time here together as a couple and with friends, and it was really a sanctuary for them. Hart passed away at the house in November 2011.

The hillside house now serves as a personal grounding for Wehr’s sojourns from her house on Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts. As a fitting tribute, Wehr has commissioned a different small fairy home using a meadow and a grove of trees that match off the west end of the home. The fairy home will be about 36 inches tall, 18 inches wide and 22 inches long. Wehr has committed the small structure for a party of Hart’s life study of the significance of fairy tales in storytelling and in Jungian psychology.

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A Seattle Remodel Channels Palm Springs

You often hear about a house being really well constructed, and that was definitely the case with this remodeled 1908 Craftsman. However, “well constructed” and “nicely laid out” are two completely different things. “The entire way it had been set up prevented you from getting any link to the view over Ballard, a really adorable neighborhood in Seattle,” says designer and architect Charlene Wilson, of Portal Design, “or any link whatsoever to the backyard.”

Wilson states that Lots of the inspiration for the house came from the lifestyle in Palm Springs, California. The homeowners have a holiday house there, and Wilson spent some time with them in the desert and went to occasions during the city’s yearly Modernism Week.

One of the things that they enjoy about Palm Springs is the capacity to live inside and outside, not something you can do in Seattle. “The sense of being able to stream from inside to outside was one of the chief drivers in renovating this house,” states Wilson.

at a Glance
Who lives here: 2 engineers
Location: Seattle
Size: 2,100 square feet on two floors, and a 180-square-foot attic; 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths
That is interesting: The Ballard neighborhood of Seattle was full of tiny homes, because the region is very sloped and the lots are rather narrow.

Portal Design Inc

The house includes a reverse floor plan, with the bedrooms and baths on the first floor and an open kitchen, living room and dining space, and a half bath, on the second degree.

For your second floor, Wilson purposefully remained with fundamental finishes that could be timeless — walnut flooring, white kitchen cabinets along with a marble kitchen island. “But we also wanted to introduce some whimsy to the plan,” she says. “We implemented wallpaper over the credenza from the sofa, but to a small area so that it is easily changed later on.”

The aquamarine-blue touches reminded Wilson and her clients of Palm Springs. “It had been one of those things we saw on a lot of house tours, and it just stuck,” says Wilson, “combined with the usage of timber on ceilings.”

Gray couch: EQ3; round glass table: classic, Eileen Gray; cushions: Waverly Small Talk Accent; carpeting: Andalusia, West Elm; dining table: handmade by Amish furniture makers in Ontario, Canada; Shell Chairs: Eames; yellow seats: classic, Area 51; white couch: classic; acrylic tables: Gus Timber; hanging light fixture: black Tom Dixon Beat Light Broad; credenza: custom design by Charlene Wilson, fabricated by 7 Hills Design; background: Flavor Paper Scrubs on Gold Pony Skin Foil; wall sconces over credenza, (on background): SuperOrdinate Antler Sconce, Design Within Reach

Portal Design Inc

The look of the front elevation was influenced by the website’s sloping nature. “We created a pop-out over the garage that’s clad in metal and balances that facet of the house,” states Wilson. She also added quite a few new windows to allow as much light as you possibly can.

The green part of the facade is Hardie board panels, and the gray is Hardie board siding. The existing porch has been torn down and replaced with one with a ceiling made of cedar car decking — a component that’s also used inside the house on some of the ceiling on the second floor — along with a stainless steel door.

“Since the lot is so intense,” Wilson says, “we had to create quite a few transitions to get from the driveway upward, from the sidewalk up, and have that link to have the ability to go across the side of the house to the backyard.”

Portal Design Inc

The stairs are in the same place as they were in the first house, but inside their previous incarnation they have been completely submerged. “What we decided to do in an effort to not completely demolish the house, and do too many structural alterations, was to utilize a steel frame after the walls have been eliminated,” states Wilson. “By doing that we were able to keep the members much smaller.”

She adds, “We also really liked the modern aesthetic of the painted steel with timber offsets.” The stair treads are parallel strand lumber, and the railing, using stainless steel wires, was custom made by Portal Design and fabricated by its own builder.

Portal Design Inc

The kitchen island is topped with marble and clad in gray lacquer over medium-density fiberboard (MDF). The timber toe kick is walnut, to match the ground. The art is from Shag from Palm Springs.

Bar stools: CB2; pendants: Tech Lighting Pele Pendants; refrigerator: Architect Series, KitchenAid

Portal Design Inc

The walnut wrap around the left side of the refrigerator frames from the white cabinets. “The idea was to create a furniture type of appearance, where there’s a border of walnut revealing, and offsetting that with the white lacquer,” states Wilson.

The little cupboard over the sink is tied to the cupboard to its left and then jumps up to create an enclosure to the stove hood. “The exhaust tube that comes out of the stove hood is unsightly, but on account of the roof slope we weren’t able to highlight it how you normally would using a stainless steel hood,” states Wilson.

She adds, “So that box was produced to hide the hood, along with the squarish cupboard to the right is its counterbalance. It was just one of those things born of necessity.” The stairs to the right lead up to the attic office.

Range: 30-inch gas, Wolf; countertops: Caesarstone

Portal Design Inc

The plan of the master bedroom again reflects Wilson’s effort to keep things that were going to be permanent as impartial as possible. “There’s a lot of light in the house, and about the headboard wall we wanted a great neutral to dark color,” states Wilson. “We decided that hot gray partly because it’s a simple color to decorate with as a backdrop. You can throw anything against it, and it’s going to look fantastic.”

Since the master bathroom is buried a bit in the center of the house, Wilson used a frosted glass panel from the shower allowing more daylight to creep into the bathroom.

Bed: Min Bed with Plexi Headboard, Design Within Reach; linens: Ironwork, West Elm; lamp, table at left: classic; lamp on shelf: Tube Top, Design Within Reach; art: Creamsicles print, Crate & Barrel; wall paint: Chelsea Gray HC-168, Benjamin Moore

Portal Design Inc

For the primary toilet, Wilson decided to possess the backsplash go from the top of the counter to the ceiling to accent the alcove. This also plays to the verticality of the mirror, which includes inside lights on either side.

The blue part of the vanity is lacquered MDF, although the timber elements here and about the bathtub surround are walnut.

Backsplash: Seattle Tile Company; countertop: Caesarstone; sink: Vero, Duravit; faucet: Metris, Hansgrohe; bathtub: Paiova, Duravit; rain showerhead: Arzo, Delta; floors: Fiel Obsidian Black (12 by 24), Seattle Tile Company

Portal Design Inc

A deck opens off the main living area and cantilevers over a little addition Wilson added to enlarge the master bedroom. The awning is frosted acrylic and was custom made.

Outdoor fireplace: Modfire

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Culture an Appearance With Artifacts

I have been collecting African artifacts for approximately 15 years. My collection began after a trip to Africa in 1997 with my husband. In the lobby of our hotel was a group of African artifacts, such as masks, textiles and various carved pieces that I will never forget. The appeal was instant: I had been shot with all the geometric nature of the carvings, and the caliber of the artifacts seemed to tell a story with every detail.

I fell in love with all the artifacts of Africa and decided to learn about them and use them in spaces I layout. In addition to their rich significance, they supply visual interest and can be used in modern, transitional and conventional spaces. Take a peek at these designers have imported Africa into these beautiful and curated spaces.

Safari Fusion

Bamileke Feather Headdress (whitened) | Juju Hat – AUD 595

This sleek and modern space includes a fantastic feather headdress out of Cameroon. The feathers worn by chiefs and significant dancers during celebrations symbolize prosperity and emulate the feathers of birds. The feathers have been woven onto a raffia foundation that spray right into a huge circle and look fantastic as wall art. The item is available in many colours but makes a modern and textural statement in white here.

Ken Gutmaker Architectural Photography

The variety of African stools is excellent and diverse. Each style of carving and form represents a particular country, tribe or region. Here the sculptural, hand-carved quality of the stool onto the hearth contrasts the white brick wall. Notice how perfectly paired the stool is with the modern Saarinen Tulip table and chair.

Charmean Neithart Interiors

The Kuba cloth of Zaire is made of raffia palm leaves; among other applications, it is used for skirts during ceremonial occasions. The patterns are generally geometric, with colours derived from local plant resources. This beautiful bit of Kuba cloth was made to a cushion for a bold and colorful pairing with all the geometric lines of this rattan chair.

Willman Interiors / Gina Willman, ASID

Here at the base of the bed is a Senufo stool of the Ivory Coast. Made from one piece of timber, this stool is highly functional in form in addition to getting a graceful, simple profile. These kinds of stools create great benches and end tables.

KuDa Photography

Tribal masks from several areas are combined for an eye-catching screen within this modern, color-filled room. This room feels very sophisticated due to the bold contrast of modern bits against the backdrop of the rustic masks and palaces. The Warren Platner chairs in vibrant yellow appear to mirror the kind of African sculpture.

Sutton Suzuki Architects

These circular types are in the Mbole people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. They have been used as currency during significant transactions and create beautiful, sculptural accessories mounted and placed in a small grouping.

Shirley Meisels

Another example of a Juju hat in a vibrant fucshia colour. I really like the way the designer paired this with bold black and white stripes on the wall. This is a good example of how these bits can be utilised in a whimsical and unexpected display to create a transitional look.

Charmean Neithart Interiors

In the foreground a Bamileke king’s stool is used as a table. All these fantastic textural pieces are also known as spider tables. The spider has great relevance to the Bamileke people and, like the king, is believed to possess sacred knowledge and the ability to address problems. The king uses these tables during public ceremonies, but they look fantastic as tables. They’re also available in larger sizes that make great coffee tables.

Carson Poetzl, Inc..

This expansive sculptural part is a Tji-Wara headdress by the Bumbara people of Mali in northwest Africa. All these headdresses are worn with designated farmers at planting period through a ceremonial dance. The headdress and dance are symbolic of an antelope, which can be coveted as a perfect creature. Placed within an entry this bit is a stunning introduction and also a conversation starter.

Blue Tangerine Art

This comfy guest bedroom has multiple cultural artifacts, developing a well-traveled look. On the couch are cushions made from Kasai velvet, yet another creation of the Kuba people in the Republic of the Congo. Inside this fabric a level stem-stitch embroidery is used between heap areas for contrast. The result is a velvety, geometric group of neutrals that makes a fantastic transitional style.

Do you have any African pieces into your home? Allow me to know in the Comments section.

More:
Give Your House A Few Worldwide Style

Refresh Your Space With Exotic Decor

Guest Picks: Handicrafts from Rwanda

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