Browse Category: Home Painting

How to Straighten Out Curtains

Curtains add all kinds of great things to a space, from visual interest to delicate shade and solitude, but they occasionally seem to get a mind of their own. No matter how often you tug on them, then they insist on hanging slightly askew. Curtains behave this way for a variety of motives, but with some investigative work and a little bit of imagination you can get them back on the straight and narrow.

Degree

Whenever your curtains are hanging twisted, the error may not be with your curtains, but with the curtain pole. The best way to make certain is to place a carpenter’s level on top of the curtain and check to confirm that the bubble is centered. If it is not, you’ll want to look at the brackets to see if one of these is loose. When they’re tight, loosen the screws on tap and one on the bracket lightly with a mallet to move it up or down until the bubble at the level is on true. Tightening the screws on the brackets need to ensure that the curtain pole remains level.

Iron

Mirrors which get opened and closed a lot can develop wrinkles that keep them from hanging straight. 1 way to repair this it to carry your curtains down and wash them if they’re machine washable. If they are not, shake them out to remove any dust that may have settled on them. Put your curtains wrong side up on your ironing board and press on the creases and wrinkles out with an iron set at the appropriate heat for the curtain material. Placing a dish towel or pillowcase in addition to the cloth can stop damage if it has a synthetic lining or is extremely fragile.

Starch

Sometimes keeping your curtains too tidy can contribute their hanging oddly. Washing can weaken or even remove the sizing that retains drapes sharp. This is particularly true of lightweight sheers. You can place the body back in your curtains by making homemade starch from cornstarch and water. After a good soaking in starchy water, then hang the curtains to dry and iron them or give them a quick spin in a cool dryer with no fabric softener sheet to give them a crisp appearance and the body to hang properly.

Weights

Back in the day, royals maintained their skirts from exposing state secrets by having the palace seamstresses sew weights to the hems. If your curtains are hanging crookedly since a number of those threads have shrunk while some haven’t, it is possible to open the hem only enough to slip in weights. The small, metal weight can help pull the curtains down to hang evenly.

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How to repair a Conservatory Roof

A conservatory, also called a sunroom, is a space connected to the bright side of a home that has clear walls and roof that let the sun shine in. Homeowners use conservatories to grow flowers and other plants or for outdoorlike entertaining. A frequent reason for conservatory escapes is deterioration of the seals around the transparent roof panes. Oftentimes, you can reseal the roof rims yourself.

Find Leak

First, analyze the conservatory’s roof in the inside to determine where it is leaking. The best time to do so is when it is raining. Most leaks occur around the edges of the transparent roof panes. If yours is a slanted roof, look carefully. The place where the water drips may not be the place where it is coming in. Once you’ve identified the leaking pane, then you can reseal it with a flexible glass sealing material rated for exterior use.

Scrape Out Old Seal

Lay a ladder against the outside framework of the conservatory so that you can achieve the leaking pane. Gently scrape out the old seal stuff along the edges of the transparent panel with a utility knife, lift the panel and clean all traces of the old sealant in the framework. Put a bead of the newest sealant in the frame, press the clear panel back in place and apply a bead of the sealant around the outer edges. Follow manufacturer instructions regarding putting or drying times to the sealant.

Cracked Pane

If the existing pane is cracked or broken, then apply tape across the pane in several instructions to hold the pieces together while you eliminate the bad pane. Eliminate the old sealant in the framework. Cut a new pane to match the measurements of the old pane, then apply sealant to the frame, set in the new pane and apply more sealant around the outside of the framework.

Leak Sealing

An alternate fix for escapes entails applying a sealant round the leaking pane without undermining it. Climb the ladder to achieve the leaking pane, then remove all debris and dirt, spray window cleaner on the leaking area and wipe clean with a soft fabric. Apply a flexible exterior glass sealant over the leaking area and allow to dry. Wipe the area clean with a soft fabric.

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How to guard the Inside Part of Kitchen Cabinets

To maintain your kitchen’s upper cabinets looking good, lightweight shelf paper on the seams, and creating a habit of drying any wetness off of dishware you might shop there, may be all you need. Protecting the seams of lower cabinets is more of a challenge, however. Leaks, spills and regular use can damage the surface of the cabinet bottoms and even raise the danger of mold and mildew growth. With proper care and maintenance, it is possible to protect the insides of your lower cabinets and preserve their condition.

Start Fresh

If the insides of the kitchen cabinets have already suffered any damage, repair them. Placing a protective covering over existing spills or leaks can trap moisture and create a breeding ground for mold and mildew. Under-sink cabinets are especially prone to water damage, but fluid and food can splash anywhere at a kitchen. Clean spills with household detergent and a damp cloth and dry the cabinet thoroughly with a fan. If you discover a little bit of mold in the cabinets, put on a protective mask and eliminate the mold by wiping and scrubbing the area down with a bleach alternative. Apply a coat of mildew-cide paint to the bottom to prevent future mold growth. If you suspect your cabinets have a significant mold infestation, then consult with a specialist.

Choose a Liner

A kitchen lower cabinets typically serve several distinct functions. The cabinets under the sink typically hold household cleaners. Another cabinets might be utilized to store pots and pans, small appliances or cupboard items. Pick a liner for every single cabinet that provides the protection it needs. Non-adhesive liners, which is removed for cleaning, can be found in a variety of fashions. To get under-sink cabinets, choose a waterproof liner with a smooth feel that you may wipe easily. Use a padded liner to protect the base of a cabinet that houses heavy cookware or canned products. In cabinets that have light use, adhesive-backed paper produces a protective surface that’s affordable and simple to clean. Vinyl tiles provide lasting, heavy-duty protection for cabinet seams, though installation requires some DIY skills.

Install Drawers and Shelves

Liners protect the seams of the kitchen cabinets by spills, dents and scrapes, but a closet storage system also reduces the danger of damage. In deep cabinets, install sliding cable drawers to hold pots and pans. The drawers allow easy entry to heavy cookware without pulling it over the floor of the cabinets. If you use your kitchen lower cabinets as a pantry, outfit them with wire shelves which permit you to store and stack items without creating the prospect of a damaging avalanche of jars and cans. The plumbing in under-sink cabinets makes them vulnerable to moisture from leaks and condensation. You’ll have to be vigilant for water problems in this area, but you can decrease the danger of spill damage from keeping cleaning products in plastic bins.

Keep Them Clean

No way of protecting the interior of your kitchen cabinet is foolproof. Liquids can make their way round the borders of liners and into the gaps between vinyl tiles. Over time, shelf liners may become less successful. To maintain your lower cabinets safe from damage, address any problems as they arise. Check the liners periodically and replace them once they show signs of tear and wear. If spills — which are unavoidable in a kitchen — occur, wipe them up and make sure stains and moisture don’t seep through the liner to the surface of the cabinet seams. The under-sink cabinets require special vigilance. Repair any leaking pipes immediately and continually be on the lookout for mold and mildew.

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How to Dry Dishes and Not Leave Lint

Drying dishes within minutes of washing and setting them in a dish drainer helps them remain spot-free. Some kinds of dishtowels, however, create a issue just as annoying as spots — lint all over the dishes. Towels designed to be equally absorbent and lint-free, occasionally referred to as glass towels, make certain the dishes dry completely with no lint left behind.

Selecting the Ideal Dish Towel

While the look of a single dish towel may fluctuate greatly in the following, so can its effectiveness. Some dish towels made from fabric blends don’t absorb well and leave lint or fuzz supporting when drying, leading to dishes which are still moist and covered in lint. Decide on a cotton or linen dish towel listed as highly absorbent to get the best drying capability; cotton will consume the best. To prevent lint, elect for finely woven dish towels designed for glass and crystal. These towels have been gentle on dishes, absorb water and don’t leave lint behind. Some manufacturers sell microfiber towels designed for dishes and dishes for lint-free drying. If you don’t mind a towel constructed for a different purpose, surgical or “huck” towels, originally made to wash sterilized medical equipment, are absorbent and don’t leave lint.

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The Way to Refinish Hardwood Floors Obviously

Refinishing hardwood flooring can prove an procedure, if done correctly but it is far more affordable than replacing the timber, and may restore your floor to its original, natural shine. You must use natural alternatives to find the job finished, if you want avoid destructive and harmful chemicals during the procedure.

Preparation

Clear out the room and clean your hardwood floor with a mop and a solution of 10 parts water to one part vinegar. White vinegar is a safe, natural solution to chemical-based cleaners, but it is highly acidic, so be certain you dilute it. Hand-sand that the perimeter of the room with 180-grit sandpaper and a sanding block. Try to sand up to six inches outside the bottom board. The regions can smooth out that a buffer can’t reach.

Buffing

Attach into a floor buffer and a put on a dust mask. You can rent a floor buffer from some home improvement stores if you do not have access to one. Move the buffer throughout the room from the direction of the wood grain, moving from side to side. Maintain the buffer in movement while it is on. Wait about 15 minutes and vacuum or sweep the floor to remove the powder left by the finish.

Choosing Your Finish

While searching for hardwood floor finishes, you may notice that the majority of finishes contain other chemicals and petroleum. If you shop around it is possible to find natural oils that work as eco friendly alternatives. Try a natural oil like jojoba oil, tung oil or Jojoba oil, all which provide an excellent finish without endangering the environment or your health. If you are interested in finding a color finish, or would rather have a commercial finish, start looking for a finishing wax derived from renewable oils and waxes.

Implementing Your Finish

Apply the finish to the perimeter of the room along the baseboards with a small paintbrush. With the perimeter coated, you are able to begin applying the oil. Pour a field of oil across the wood’s grain and work the finish into the floor with a paint roller, moving with all the grain and then across it. Continue distributing the oil. Then add oil. Until your floor is coated, Proceed and add another coat after three hours. Wait 1 week before returning furniture.

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